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Archive for May, 2019

13 May
Comments Off on Psychologist wrote children’s books while having sex with vulnerable patient

Psychologist wrote children’s books while having sex with vulnerable patient

A profile of Harry Mayr describes him as “an innocent dreamer” whose fictional character Ilsa “helps them make sense of life’s many journeys and challenges”.
Nanjing Night Net

However, Mr Mayr, a psychologist and author of children’s books, has been found guilty of professional misconduct for having a sexual relationship with a patient he was treating for past sexual traumas.

The NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal detailed a series of transgressions, which included Mr Mayr licking the patient’s face during therapy and engaging in “inappropriate sexual contact” at the end of other sessions.

He subsequently had what the tribunal called an “inappropriate sexual relationship” with the patient for almost two years, including having sex with the patient on his desk at his clinic in Penrith.

On another occasion, Mr Mayr performed oral sex on the patient while she was on the clinic’s kitchen bench.

The tribunal said Mr Mayr failed to provide appropriate care and treatment by suggesting the patient watch Last Tango in Paris and 1977 French film Bilitis, which one reviewer said: “If released today, its lingering, leery shots of barely developed school girls would no doubt cause a Bill Henson-like backlash.”

The tribunal cancelled Mr Mayr’s registration to practise psychology for five years.

“The profession needs to be made aware that such behaviour cannot be tolerated by the profession without damage to the good name of the profession of psychology,” the tribunal said in its judgment.

The tribunal said Mr Mayr would have been fully aware of a power imbalance a psychologist and a patient in a vulnerable state: “Nevertheless he proceeded to use that imbalance of power to satisfy his own needs.”

The tribunal noted that sex between psychologists and patients is prohibited under the Australian Psychological Society’s code of ethics.

Mr Mayr first met the patient in 2006 when she brought her preschool age child, who suffered from anxiety, to his St Marys/Penrith Psychological Services clinic.

Four years later, she returned to the clinic with her oldest child who had Asperger’s Syndrome before beginning regular therapy sessions with Mr Mayr.

The tribunal said Mr Mayr failed to maintain appropriate professional boundaries with his patient by sharing personal information including extra marital affairs and “past indiscretions with a female patient”.

The tribunal said Mr Mayr commented on similarities between the patient and the main character in the children’s book he was writing.

Mr Mayr’s first book, Ilsa, the funny looking hippopotamus, was published in 2012 and won a “Mom’s Choice Award” in 2013, according to his author website.

“Ilsa’s innocence and genuineness captivate and unite people of all ages around the world,” the website said.

He wrote a second book, Ilsa’s waterhole of priceless treasures, and sold Ilsa merchandise.

Meanwhile, the tribunal said Mr Mayr sent emails from mid-2011 to his patient detailing his sexual fantasies and “encouraged her to perform or engage in certain sexual activities”.

In one therapy session, the tribunal said Mr Mayr kissed the patient’s stomach and breasts and “stated words to the effect of ‘I am the type of person who would be in the shower with you and would take a shampoo bottle and put it up your arse’.”

Appearing before the tribunal, the patient said Mr Mayr had not explained why his sexual advances, apart from hugging, would be helpful as a method of treatment.

“She did not know whether he helped her but her mental state was such that whatever he wanted her to do she would go along with it,” the tribunal said. “After a moments reflection she stated that he did not help her and in fact made her worse.”

The tribunal said Mr Mayr lacked insight into his conduct “save as it impacts upon himself and he speaks of ‘this one error in judgement’ as if his course of conduct over a period of three years could be limited in this way”.

Mr Mayr declined to comment but indicated that he would seek to appeal against the decision.

Cameron Stewart, a professor of health, law and ethics at the University of Sydney, said dozens of doctors and psychologists had been struck off for having sex with patients.

“People are unaware of how often this happens,” he said.

Professor Stewart said inappropriate sexual relationships particularly occurred with vulnerable patients: “The connection between a health professional and the patient is so strong that it’s hard for some health practitioners to differentiate the therapeutic relationship and relationships of affection.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

13 May
Comments Off on Melbourne scientists make groundbreaking cancer discovery

Melbourne scientists make groundbreaking cancer discovery

Melbourne scientists have made a groundbreaking discovery in the fight against cancer, finding a way to reduce the growth of some tumours.
Nanjing Night Net

Researchers from the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute have found that inhibiting a particular protein can suspend the growth of bowel and gastric cancers.

Gastrointestinal cancers are among the most common and deadly forms of cancer, affecting more than 15,000 Australians each year.

Scientific director at the institute Professor Matthias Ernst led the pioneering research, which was published in the latest issue of medical journal Cancer Cell.

“Our discovery could potentially offer a new and complementary approach to chemotherapy and immunotherapy as options for treating gastrointestinal cancers,” Professor Ernst said.

In preclinical trials, his research showed a protein called hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK) had a powerful role in the development of cancer because of its effect on macrophages, which are important cells of the immune system.

“These cells can behave like ‘garbage collectors’ when they remove unwanted debris or damaged cells, or they can behave like ‘nurses’ to help at sites of injury and wounding,” Professor Ernst said.

“What we’ve now discovered is the more HCK activity a macrophage has, the more it nurtures cancer cell growth and survival.”

Professor Ernst’s team found that inhibiting HCK using a small drug-like molecule could stop the growth of bowel and gastric cancers.

Head of medical oncology at the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Wellness & Research Centre Dr Niall Tebbutt said bowel cancer was generally resistant to conventional immunotherapy treatments.

He said the research offered a “new approach to possibly overcome this resistance”.

Victorian Health Minister Jill Hennessey said the results were another step forward in the fight against cancer.

“Stomach and bowel cancers are among the biggest killers of Victorians each year and this revolutionary development has the potential to one day save thousands of lives,” she said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

13 May
Comments Off on Girls with single parents more than twice as likely to be obese

Girls with single parents more than twice as likely to be obese

File photo: iStockYoung girls with single parents are more than twice as likely to be obese as girls living in two-parent households, while boys’ obesity is more likely to be linked to takeaway food consumption, according to new research.
Nanjing Night Net

Professor Peter O’Rourke, a senior biostatistician at Queensland’s QIMR Berghofer medical research institute, analysed information gathered on more than 3500 children to explore the differences between genders and age groups in regards to childhood obesity.

The research, published in Public Health, revealed Queensland’s obesity rate in children was 9 per cent, 2 per cent higher than the 2011-2012 national average.

Socio-economic conditions, diet and exercise were named as the three factors that most heavily influenced a child’s likelihood of being obese.

Photo: iStock

But Professor O’Rourke said the effects of these factors differed between boys and girls.

“For girls, particularly older girls, the main contributing factor was parental social disadvantage. It was manifest by both the education level of parents and single status of parents,” he said.

“For boys the dominant factor was excessive use of takeaway foods.”

Key findings were:Boys aged 5-1112 per cent were obeseFactors strongly associated with obesity were parents’ level of education, takeaway food consumption and lack of participation in organised sport.Boys who parents were not university educated were more than twice as likely to be obese.Boys who ate takeaway food two or more times a week were nearly two-and-a-half times more likely to be obese.Boys aged 12-17Seven per cent were obeseFactors strongly associated with obesity were parental education and takeaway food.Girls aged 5-1111 per cent were obeseFactors strongly associated with obesity were parent’s level of education and marital status.Younger girls with single parents were more than twice as likely to be obese as girls living in two-parent householdsGirls aged 12 to 17Four per cent were obeseFactors strongly associated with obesity were parents who were not university educated.These girls were also three times more likely to be obese if from a single-parent household, and more than twice as likely to be obese if they do not participate in organised sportProfessor O’Rourke said determining why girls and boys were so different when it came to obesity was not part of the research scope.

“We do not know why girls from single-parent households are more likely to be obese. More research needs to be done in this area,” he said.

“I could speculate that girls are more sensitised by family issues and boys have more freedom so therefore make more independent choices about takeaway foods.

Photo: iStock

“Knowing which factors are associated with obesity in boys and girls of different ages is crucial because it will help policy makers to develop effective age- and gender-specific strategies to tackle childhood obesity.”

Professor O’Rourke said the research was done in conjunction with the Queensland government Department of Health as it conducted regular surveys of a whole range of health indicators on behalf of the commonwealth.

“After they had performed their analysis and done state-wide reporting we had access to the data to identify our particular theme which was childhood obesity and then screen from their surveys the risk factors to identify which of these were important risk factors contributing to childhood obesity,” he said.

Mother Jo Walker said she found the findings of the research frightening.

“I wouldn’t say the parents are at fault. I understand for single parents or time-poor parents it is hard to bake fresh food all the time and prepare nice healthy meals,” Mrs Walker said.

“But I suppose at the end of the day they are the ones doing the shopping and offering the food up; I guess in some ways it does come down to them.”

Mrs Walker, who has a four-year-old son, said she had already started educating him on the importance of health.

“I think even now we are educating him, you know – we don’t eat that sort of food very often because it’s not good for us, it’s not good for our teeth, it’s not good for our tummies,” she said.

“So just hopefully as he gets older I can explain a little bit more why it’s not good for him.”

Professor O’Rourke said he was keen to follow up on the initial research, funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.

“The problem is still an important one and obviously we would like to see what impact our results have; have things changed; what are new messages and new trends that should be investigated?” he said.

13 May
Comments Off on To afford the rent, tenants should turn apartments into mini petting zoos

To afford the rent, tenants should turn apartments into mini petting zoos

NewsThe new look Yarralumla play station. complete with mini golf of Canberra’s famous iconsThe Canberra TimesDate: 17 March 2016Photo Jay Cronan Photo: Jay CronanControversial US ‘rent-bidding’ start-up Rentberry to launch in AustraliaRenting househunters forced to jump through extra hoops in Sydney’s tight rental marketRenting an exercise in crowd control for Melburnians
Nanjing Night Net

It’s so very easy to look at the property market right now and see nothing but doom and gloom.

Fortunately everything’s swell for those on the renting side of the equation at the moment – especially with the news that Rentberry is set to launch in Australia and allow would-be tenants to fight to the death in real-time by bidding for rents.

Sure, critics point out that this will turn the nightmarish process of applying for rental properties into a gladiatorial bloodsport that will drive the rents in larger cities from their current level of “offensive” to “downright insulting” – renters in the Bay Area enjoyed a price jump of the order of five per cent when the app launched locally – but these criticisms fail to take into account the important qualifying factor that Rentberry are based in the US and couldn’t care less about you povvo types.

Just think of it as the Uber of house hunting: you just put in the rental price that most stretches you beyond your ability to keep body and soul together in order to appeal to the landlord, and then … um, then the nearest house drives over, or something? And probably does something disruptive and agile on the way.

In any case, there’s been one fascinating development that should have renters feeling slightly less like walking into the sea: the news that NSW Labor have decided that if they get into power, they’ll make having pets a right of renters across the board.

There has been much criticism of this thought bubble from property management groups, landlord bodies, and cat-hiding services who can see their lucrative inspection-time dollars drying up.

And while this little plan sounds like the sort of thing that’s likely to be forgotten as soon as Labor get into power, since NSW is essentially a develocracy, it also represents the only reasonable hope that tenants have if we all have to start bidding against one another for shelter: the start of a much-needed income stream in the form of mini petting zoos.

Sure, it’s not going to be easy to share a one-bedroom flat with some alpacas, some ducklings and a tiny pony that the kids can ride, but since we’re definitely not going to do anything meaningful about housing affordability, we need to start thinking outside the litter box.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

13 May
Comments Off on Hunter BreakfastApril 12

Hunter BreakfastApril 12

Morning Shot: @state.of.grace.8/InstagramWeather: Showers in Newcastle (22 degrees) andNelson Bay (23 degrees). Shower or two in Raymond Terrace,Wallsend, Toronto (23 degrees).
Nanjing Night Net

Traffic: A car and caravan is broken down on the M1 near Wisemans Ferry. Northbound traffic is affected as a tow truck attends the area. Drivers are urged to exercise caution.

Beachwatch:With south to south-east winds pushing a few showers onto the coast it’s only going to be an average day beachside. The swell is from the south around 2 to 3 metres but is expected to ease during the day. Once again the southern ends will be the best value. In the city try Stockton, Nobbys, Flatrock, Merewether and Dudley. Down south try Blacksmiths, Caves and Catho. At Port Sephens try Fingal and One Mile. Most open beaches will be closed to the swimmer due to dangerous rips so be extra careful if you do venture in. The water temperature is 20 degrees.

Trains: Good service on the Newcastle and Hunter lines.

Hunter headlinesONE of the Hunter’s largest employers says “policy instability and uncertainty” in the Australianenergy market is making it harder to justify investing in the region. Read more.

Parliamentary Secretary for the Hunter, Scot MacDonald, is urging motorists to make every journey a safe one this Easter in a bid to drive down the road toll towards zeroon the Hunter’s roads. Read more.

Organisers of the Karuah Bluegrass Music Festival are on the hunt to find major sponsors. Read more.

THE infamously slow and unreliabletwo-and-a-half hour train ride from Newcastle to Sydney has been getting worse since 2011, and transport authorities don’t know how to fix it. Read more.

Easter has come early at The Australian Reptile Park on the Central Coast with the birth of five healthy –and adorable –dingo puppies. Read more.

MORE details about the state government’s plan to redirect buses away from Hunter Street have emerged, with the proposal to see more than 40 car spaces cut from surrounding streets. Read more.

The demand for Tailor Made Fish Farm’s product and technology has pushed the Port Stephens business to the point of expansion, which is why it has been listed for sale. Read more.

A GLOW-in-dark streak of blue pavement will be among the more eye-catching elements of a facelift for the Warners Bay foreshore,due to begin next week. Read more.

FORMER Jets captains and 100-plus game players Matt Thompson and Jobe Wheelhouse believe under-siege Newcastle coach Mark Jones deserves a chance to build his own squad next season. Read more.

REGIONAL NEWS► BALLARAT: A disability pensioner slugged with a Centrelink debt three weeks out from major surgery said she prays every day that the robo-debt system “gets its comeuppance”.

Scarsdale’s Lee-Anne Thomas received a debt notice for just under $700 late last November for an overpayment allegedly made by the department in 2010. She said she asked the welfare agency to hold off the debt until she afterher surgery when she could investigate the claimbut her request was refused. Read on

Elsa Hoggard said the first that she heard of her debt to Centrelink was through a Sydney debt collector. Picture: Luka Kauzlaric.

►WOLLONGONG: Thieves have devastated an Albion Park Rail tobacconist for the third time in six weeks, this time using a ute to bust open the shop in a spectacular pre-dawn raid.

The raids, ona Cignall shop off Ash Avenue, have cost the business almost $40,000 in lost stock, property damage and stolen cash. Read more

Avninder Singh has cleaned up his Ash Avenue shop three times in the wake of damaging and costly break-ins. Picture: Robert Peet

►CANBERRA: Graduating university represents the culmination of years of hard work for most, but for Canberra man and paraplegic Paul Jenkins it marked something much more.

Mr Jenkins has spent the past six months training in an exoskeleton deviceand on Tuesday realised his dream of walking on stage at Parliament House and accepting his two bachelor degrees from the University of Canberra. Read more

Paraplegic Paul Jenkins learning to walk with bionic legs with exercise physiologist Jim Barrett. Photo: Rohan Thomson

►WAGGA: Twostricken teens may find a new home in Wagga as their aunt vows to keep a family promise.

Shanon Heidemann, 17, has lived a nightmare following the death of his father, who was swept away in the Queensland floods, west of Gympie.

As Shanonhelped emergency services searchthe floodwatersfor 50-year-old David Heidemann,he was told hismother and brother had died in a fatal collision on the Princes Highway at Berry. Read on

Tragedy inspires support: The Berry Crash Tragedy gofundme page pic.

►PORT AUGUSTA:Reach Solar energy reachedfinancial close on the first phase of the 300 Megawatt BungalaSolarproject near Port Augusta.And at the same time, entered sale agreements withEnelGreen Power (EGP) and the Dutch Infrastructure Fund. Read more

The 70MW solar farm in Northern NSW, a similar, but smaller proposed project than the Bungala Solar Project.

►MANDURAH: Regional development minister Alannah MacTiernan has given the strongest indication yet that she will overhaul the Royalties for Regions program to give it a stronger focus on job creation.

The program, which was first proposed by former Nationals WA leaderBrendon Grylls, has invested more than $6 billion in the regions since 2008.

Ms MacTiernan said the incoming Labor government would redirect Royalties for Regions funding to infrastructure that created jobs, such as renewable energy projects. Read on

Regional development minister Alannah MacTiernan with Mandurah MP David Templeman. Photo: Marta Pascual Juanola.

NATIONAL WEATHERWhat does it look like in your neck of the woods today?

NATIONAL NEWS►The Turnbull government’s budget razor gang is set to consider changes to the $10 billion Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme designed to bring down the price of medicines and kill off a potentially damaging fight with pharmacists. Read on

►Australia has failed to comply with its international obligation to crack down on family trusts, despite concerns they could be misused for tax evasion, money laundering and the financing of terrorism. Read on

Andrew Leigh MP outside his office which is 600m outside the new Fraser border. He will now need to move to a new office inside the new Fraser electorate. Photo: Rohan Thomson

►Federal funding has been stripped from two of Australia’s largest private colleges after they raked in more than $440 million from taxpayers in just three years. Read more

VIDEO SPECIAL►After a successful 2017, Party in the Paddock will return to White Hills, Tasmania from February 9 to 10, 2018. Organisers announced the event had been confirmed for another year, with grand plans for the Paddock’s sixth edition.

WORLD NEWS ►The team bus of German football team Borussia Dortmund was damaged and a player was injured following three explosions near the vehicle on its way to Tuesday’s Champions League game at home to AS Monaco, police said.

The match, a quarter-final first leg at Signal Iduna Park, was called off and rescheduled for Wednesday. Read on

The team bus of the Borussia Dortmund football club seen after the bus was damaged in an explosion. Photo: Getty Images

►United Continental Holdings Inc. shares have fallenas outrage on social media over a passenger’s forcible removal from a flight spread across the globe, including to China, where local media questioned whether racism played a role in the incident. Read on

►JAKARTA:A court hearing the blasphemy trial of Jakarta’s Christian governor has been accused of succumbing to political interference after it agreed to delay proceedings until one day after the gubernatorial election.

Jakarta’s police chief wrote to the North Jakarta District Court last week requesting the trial be postponed “considering the increasing vulnerability of the security situation in Jakarta”. Read on

JUST BECAUSEON THIS DAY IN HISTORYI’ll cite you, if you cite me. pic.twitter南京夜网/1XfG3A2m9o

— Academia Obscura (@AcademiaObscura) April 10, 2017FACES OF AUSTRALIA: Tony Fisher, Peter NortonTwo of the Riverina’s longest-serving linesmen are preparing to be trained on the National Broadband Network, the latest in a long line of innovations since their careers started.

A lot has changed sinceTony Fisher and Peter Norton went to work for the Postmaster-General’s Department more than 40 years ago. Read on

Telstra linemen Tony Fisher and Peter Norton have seen a lot of changes in technology since they started their careers more than 40 years ago.